Setoguchi-Iwata awarded PCORI grant for $1.05 million

Soko Setoguchi-Iwata, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine (General Internal Medicine), has been awarded funding totaling around $1.05 million from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) for a methods research project, Improving Methods for Linking Secondary Data Sources for CER/PCOR.

The award to Dr. Setogushi-Iwata is one of 33 new funding awards that PCORI’s Board of Governors approved today.

The proposal by Setoguchi-Iwata was selected from 325 submissions that responded fully to the funding announcements PCORI issued in September.

More details are available via PCORI’s news release.

by · Posted on July 29, 2014 in Awards - grants, General Internal Medicine · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Ambulatory Care Leadership Track adds focus on legislative advocacy

From left: Residents Brice Lefler, Jeremy Halbe, Lauren Porras, Alexandra Clark, and faculty members Daniella Zipkin and Alex Cho visited Washington, D.C. as part of an opportunity to learn about legislative advocacy. Photo courtesy of Daniella Zipkin.

From left: Residents Brice Lefler, Jeremy Halbe, Lauren Porras, Alexandra Clark, and faculty members Daniella Zipkin and Alex Cho visited Washington, D.C. as part of an opportunity to learn about legislative advocacy. Photo courtesy of Daniella Zipkin.

As part of the Duke Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Ambulatory Care Leadership Track (ACLT), four Duke internal medicine residents traveled to Washington, D.C. last spring to meet with Congressional representatives and learn about legislative advocacy.

The trip was an opportunity for residents, Lauren Porras, MD; Jeremy Halbe, MD; Brice Lefler, MD; and Alexandra Clark, MD, to get practical experience in legislative advocacy. The residents are part of the residency program’s Ambulatory Care Leadership Track, a training pathway for physicians planning careers as leaders and clinicians in primary care or ambulatory subspecialty medicine.

While in Washington, the residents met with the staff of Congressional representatives for their hometowns – Houston, Miami, Durham and Jacksonville, N.C. – accompanied by Catherine Liao, assistant director for government relations in the Duke University Health System Office of Government Relations, who helped the residents prepare for the trip. In addition, the residents met with Paul Vick, associate vice president for government relations for the health system and medical center, to learn about what it is like to advocate on behalf of particular issues that are important to Duke Medicine.

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by · Posted on July 29, 2014 in Internal Medicine Residency · Read full story · Comments { 0 }
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Faculty Spotlight: Paul Lantos, MD

Each week, the Division of General Internal Medicine spotlights a different member of the division. This week, they talk with Paul Lantos, MD, about tracking and identifying Lyme disease, travel medicine, and his time in the Gambia, Peru and other locations.

by · Posted on July 28, 2014 in General Internal Medicine · Read full story · Comments { 0 }
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Assessing The Value Of Patient-Generated Data To Comparative Effectiveness Research

Lynn Howie, MD, fellow in the Division of Medical Oncology and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, is lead author on this article that appears in the July 2014 issue of Health Affairs.

Dr. Howie was in the inaugural cohort of the Duke Learning Health System Training Program.

by · Posted on July 25, 2014 in Medical Oncology, Research · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Grand Rounds 8/1/14: Surviving Sepsis Campaign: What is the role of antibiotics?

Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 9.01.14 AMMedicine Grand Rounds on Fri., Aug. 1 at 8 a.m. in Duke Hospital room 2002 will feature Greenfield Visiting Professor Marin H. Kollef, MD, professor of medicine and Virginia E. and Sam J. Golman Chair in Respiratory Intensive Care Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.

Dr. Kollef will present Surviving Sepsis Campaign: What is the role of antibiotics?

Video archives

If you can’t make Medicine Grand Rounds this week, watch a live stream or view the archived video at http://bit.ly/RSlrBP (ignore the security certificate warning, then use your Duke NetID & password).
by · Posted on July 25, 2014 in Grand Rounds · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Sad news: Michelle Winn, MD has died

WinnMichelleMichelle Winn, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology, died peacefully July 23, 2014 at home, surrounded by her family after a year-long battle with cancer.

“Michelle was an outstanding researcher, a tireless mentor and a warm and caring clinician,” said Mary Klotman, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine. “We will especially remember her warm and engaging spirit, and her dedication to colleagues, trainees, and friends.”

Dr. Winn was a graduate of the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, and subsequently did undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and medical school at East Carolina University. She came to Duke in 1992 for a residency in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry, and she continued her training here as a nephrology fellow. She joined the Duke faculty in 1999, did her research in the Center for Human Genetics and was a founding faculty member of the Duke Molecular Physiology Institute.

During her nephrology fellowship, Winn began to identify and characterize families with familial forms of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a form of kidney disease that is one of the more common causes of kidney failure requiring dialysis.

Importantly, Winn became the driving force behind these studies in FSGS, providing the vision and persistence required for her subsequent successes.

“Her breakthrough came with the publication of her research in Science describing a mutation in the TRPC6 gene causing familial FSGS,” said Thomas Coffman, MD, chief of the Division of Nephrology and mentor to Winn. “This was a major discovery that truly changed thinking in the field.”

Before the publication, there had been several reports describing genetic variants causing inherited glomerular disease, but the altered genes all encoded structural proteins in the glomerular epithelial cell or podocyte. Winn’s finding that altered function of an ion channel could cause glomerular disease substantially shifted paradigms in the field. Since a channel can be targeted by small molecules, Winn’s discovery has also suggested a new therapeutic approach in proteinuric kidney disease, an area where new treatments are sorely needed. Several pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are pursuing TRPC6 antagonists for common glomerular diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

Winn’s discovery has been widely hailed in the field and she received several prestigious awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers and the Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Nephrology. She has also been inducted into the American Society for Clinical Investigation. The American Society of Nephrology announced the Michelle P. Winn, MD, Endowed Lectureship, with support from a partnership including ASN, Duke University School of Medicine, the Department of Medicine’s Division of Nephrology, and several individuals.

Over the years, Winn ascertained more than 100 families with inherited FSGS and she recently took advantage of technologies for whole-exome sequencing to identify several new mutations with the capacity to cause FSGS. Her collaboration with David Goldstein, PhD, of the Duke Center for Human Genome Variation was featured in the Department of Medicine 2013 Annual Report.

Along with her superb scientific work, Winn was a major advocate for diversity and a role model and mentor for women and underrepresented minorities, said Laura Svetkey, MD, MHS, vice chair for faculty development and diversity and Winn’s colleague in Nephrology.

Winn served as chair of the Department of Medicine Minority Recruitment and Retention Committee, and she was a member of the Medical House Staff Selection Committee and the School of Medicine Admissions Executive Committee.  In recognition of her efforts to promote diversity, Winn received the Duke University Blue Ribbon Diversity Award in 2004.

Nephrology fellows flocked to Winn’s laboratory, and she was known as an outstanding mentor for laboratory and clinical trainees.

“Most importantly, Michelle was a wonderful and beloved individual,” said Dr. Coffman.

Winn was raised in Jacksonville, NC, by a father who spent his career in the Marine Corps and a mother who was a nurse. They imparted in Michelle a strong ethical and moral foundation, with a sense of humility and tolerance. Her unassuming, down-to-earth personality, along with absolute dedication to her friends and colleagues, made her a widely admired member of the Duke faculty.

Winn loved people, music, dancing, and life. She is survived by her loving husband and soul mate Terry, who has been with her since they were in high school.

Winn will be missed by an extended, devoted family, and a large group of friends at Duke and in the nephrology community around the world.

A memorial service for Winn will take place on the Duke University campus in the near future. Details will be posted when available.

by · Posted on July 24, 2014 in Divisions, Nephrology · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Meet your chief resident: Bonike Oloruntoba, MD

Bonike Oloruntoba, MD

Bonike Oloruntoba, MD

Bonike Oloruntoba, MD, took over as chief resident for Duke Regional Hospital and Ambulatory Medicine this month. Going into her chief resident year, Dr. Oloruntoba is looking forward to serving as a mentor and teacher, to contributing to the residency program and working with her co-chief residents.

As chief resident, Oloruntoba will oversee residents at Duke Regional and the outpatient clinics.

“At Duke Regional, I’ll be working mostly with senior assistant residents and preliminary interns,” Oloruntoba said. “It’s an opportunity for the senior residents to learn how to run a team. There is a lot of autonomy at Duke Regional, and one of the challenges for the senior residents is teaching preliminary interns who are not necessarily as interested in pursuing internal medicine as a career as the categorical interns.

“On the ambulatory side, we focus on the outpatient setting, teaching residents how to take care of basic primary care issues and transitioning patients from the hospital to the outpatient setting,” she said. “It’s an opportunity for residents to focus on other providers and specialty services and to learn how to take care of patients outside of the hospital.”

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by · Posted on July 22, 2014 in Chief Residents, Internal Medicine Residency · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Grand Rounds 7/25/14: Inpatient Handoffs

Medicine Grand Rounds on Fri., July 25 at 8 a.m. in Duke Hospital room 2002 will feature Aubrey Jolly Graham, MD, assistant professor of medicine (Hospital Medicine), with a case presentation by Aaron Mitchell, MD, chief resident for quality improvement and patient safety at the Durham VA.

Dr. Jolly-Graham will present The Evolving Story of Inpatient Handoffs: A “New” Obstacle in the Quest for Quality Patient Care.

Video archives

If you can’t make Medicine Grand Rounds this week, watch a live stream or view the archived video at http://bit.ly/RSlrBP (ignore the security certificate warning, then use your Duke NetID & password).
by · Posted on July 21, 2014 in Grand Rounds · Read full story · Comments { 0 }