Funding opp: Duke CTSA KL2 call for applications

Duke CTSA Research Career Development Award Program (Duke CTSA KL2) is now accepting applications.

Applications are due April 28, 2014. Continue Reading →

by · Posted on March 28, 2014 in Funding · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Kastan elected as new member of American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Michael Kastan, MD, PhD, executive director of the Duke Cancer Institute and the William W. Shingleton MD Professor of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology in the School of Medicine, is among four members of the Duke University faculty who have been elected members of the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Read the full release.

by · Posted on April 24, 2014 in Awards - honors, School of Medicine · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

5/2/14: Faculty vs. Residents basketball game

Mark your calendars: The annual Faculty vs. Residents basketball game will be held Fri., May 2 in Cameron Indoor Stadium. Warm up will start at 6 p.m. and the official game will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Come and cheer for the teams, and get a close look at Cameron Indoor Stadium. Kids are welcome and pictures on center court are encouraged.

by · Posted on April 24, 2014 in Events, Internal Medicine Residency · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Abraham, Pavon and Rein receive 2014 Chair’s Research Award

Mary Klotman, MD, chair of the department, and Scott Palmer, MD, vice chair for research, announced the recipients of the 2014 Chair’s Research Award, which funds junior investigators who are making the transition to becoming independent scientists prior to their acquisition of extramural funding.

Recipients of the award, and the titles of their research projects:

Dennis Abraham, MD
Medical Instructor, Division of Cardiology
TREK-1 in fibroblast differentiation and cardiac fibrosis development

Juliessa Pavon, MD
Medical Instructor, Division of Geriatrics
Adherence to venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines in hospitalized elders

Lindsay Rein, MD
Fellow, Hematology/Oncology
β–arrestin2 and the disease course of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and myelofibrosis

by · Posted on April 23, 2014 in Awards - grants, Funding · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Gastroenterology faculty named AGA committee chair

Ziad Gellad, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine (Gastroenterology), has been named chair of the new Quality Measures Committee for the American Gastroenterology Association. The AGA Institute Quality Measures Committee is charged with developing new and revising existing quality outcome measures for gastroenterology.

Dr. Gellad is the most recent AGA committee chair from the Department of Medicine. Dawn Provenzale, MD, AGAF, professor of medicine (Gastroenterology), serves as the chair of AGA’s Women’s Committee, and Jane Onken, MD, MHS, AGAF, associate professor of medicine (Gastroenterology), serves as the chair of AGA’s Education and Training Committee.

by · Posted on April 22, 2014 in Awards - honors, Gastroenterology · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Berg elected president of OPTN/UNOS

Carl BergCarl Berg, MD, professor of medicine (Gastroenterology) and medical director of abdominal transplantation, was elected the next president of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network for Organ Sharing (OPTN/UNOS) board of directors. Dr. Berg will serve a one-year term beginning July 2014.

As president, Berg will direct the efforts of the organization that serves as the nation’s organ transplant network under federal contract. His duties include leading biannual meetings of the OPTN/UNOS board, as well as serving as chair of the OPTN/UNOS Executive Committee and UNOS’ Corporate Affairs Committee. He is responsible for strategic planning in areas of patient safety, achieving best use of donated organs, equitable patient access to transplantation and addressing the U.S. organ shortage by maximizing organ donation safety.

Berg served most recently as vice president/president-elect on the OPTN/UNOS Board of Directors and its Executive Committee. Read the full release here.

by · Posted on April 22, 2014 in Awards - honors, Gastroenterology · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Chudgar to serve as director of undergraduate medical education

Saumil Chudgar, MD, MS, assistant professor of medicine in the Hospital Medicine Program and the Division of General Internal Medicine, has agreed to serve as director of undergraduate medical education for the Department effective July 1, Mary Klotman, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine, announced today.

“Saumil has distinguished himself as an enthusiastic advocate of excellence in medical education with a remarkable ability to connect with medical students,” said Dr. Klotman. “In fact, the medical students have honored him three years in a row with their Duke Medicine Golden Apple Award for Clinical Science Faculty.”

Dr. Chudgar is the course director for the Clinical Skills Course he designed as a requirement for all Duke second-year medical students. He is course director for the Effective Clinical Teaching elective, and the assistant course director for the Capstone Course for fourth-year students. For his efforts, Chudgar received a 2013 Practice Course Professionalism Award.

Continue Reading →

by · Posted on April 22, 2014 in General Internal Medicine, Medical Education · Read full story · Comments { 0 }
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May 2014 is Health System Survey Month

Duke University Health System has designated May as Health System Survey Month. Read the FAQs for more information about the surveys to be distributed in May.

by · Posted on April 21, 2014 in Duke University Health System · Read full story · Comments { 0 }

Deadly human pathogen Cryptococcus fully sequenced

Scanning electron micrograph shows infectious spores produced by the deadly fungi Cryptococcus neoformans.

Scanning electron micrograph shows infectious spores produced by the deadly fungi Cryptococcus neoformans.

Duke Today featured a study last week by a group of researchers who have sequenced the entire genome and all the RNA products of the most important pathogenic lineage of Cryptococcus neoformans, a strain of H99 responsible for a million cases of pneumonia and meningitis every year.

The results, which appears April 17 in PLOS Genetics, describe a number of genetic changes that can occur after laboratory handling of H99 that make it more susceptible to stress, hamper its ability to sexually reproduce and render it less virulent.

“We are beginning to get a grasp on what makes this organism tick. By having a carefully annotated genome of H99, we can investigate how this and similar organisms can change and mutate and begin to understand why they aren’t easily killed by antifungal medications,” said study coauthor John Perfect, MD, professor of medicine and chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, who first isolated H99 from a patient with cryptococcal meningitis 36 years ago.

by · Posted on April 21, 2014 in Infectious Diseases, Research · Read full story · Comments { 0 }